Traditional Spiders 1.
Emerald Green Woodcock
Hook:     18 - 14.
Thread:  Green silk.
Hackle:   A small red-brown feather from the marginal coverts of a woodcock wing.
Body:      Seal’s fur or floss silk may be used, but (Fogg says) ‘in this case, use emerald green  wool which is teased onto the thread as a dubbing rather than wound on.’
Though reasonable successful on stillwaters, this is essentially a river fly. Particularly on small rivers, when the conditions are low and clear. (Seal’s fur used)

Crimson Woodcock
Hook:     18 - 14.
Thread:  Crimson silk.
Hackle:   Well-marked red-brown feather from the marginal coverts of a woodcock.
Body:      Crimson tying silk, floss silk or  wool. A thorax or peacock herl or red fox fur produces an attractive fly.
The Crimson Woodcock may be regarded as a general river pattern and is particularly useful as an imitation of early stoneflies including the February red. (Seal’s fur used)
Orange Brown
Hook:     18 - 14.
Thread:  Well-waxed hot orange silk.
Hackle:   Well-marked red-brown feather from the marginal coverts of a woodcock.
Body:      Waxed hot orange silk very lightly dubbed with red-brown squirrel fur. The tying silk must clearly shine through the dubbing. The dubbing may be a little heavier just behind the hackle.
Our indigenous squirrel (European Red) now being rare, a substitute fur must be found. (Red-brown ‘possum used).

All recipes and comments are from Roger Fogg’s book :
‘A Handbook of North Country Trout Flies’.